Away kit makes debut at Queens Park Rangers

QPRblack

The new Umbro all-black away kit made its debut yesterday on the opening day of the 2014/15 Premier League campaign. City bested QPR 1-0 at Loftus Road courtesy of James Chester’s 52nd minute headed goal (marker Rio Ferdinand seemed more interested in Chester’s shirt, grabbing a feel, than contesting the ball), but had ‘keeper Allan McGregor to thank for maintaining the lead when he saved Charlie Austin’s penalty late on. McGregor was wearing the Aqua and Navy ‘keeper kit released for use with the away kit.

GKAqua

Aside from new attire, there were other notable kit occurrences... Nikica Jelavić finally got the diacritic above the C in his surname added to a Hull City shirt. Everton applied the acute accent when he played for them, and somewhat obviously it featured on his Croatian national team shirts at the World Cup in Brazil, but since his arrival from Goodison Park in the January transfer window, City had not bothered with the accent. 

Diacritic

Additionally, James Chester lost a Premier League sleeve patch at some point before his goal. He had both patches earlier on, but the applique from his right sleeve is clearly missing in goal celebration images. The patches, made by Sporting ID, were made much lighter at the start of last season, they clearly don’t glue them like they used to.

ChesterLostPatch

 

Congratulations Tigers! You get to wear these again…

patch

Hull City are back in the Premier League! It’s been nerve wracking, but our beloved Tigers have done it, securing second place in The Championship to gain entry into the top flight for a second time. Of course, The Tigers achieving promotion means more than the world being treated to the sight of Ahmed Elmohamady’s dancing, it will have kit implications too. City will trade Championship sleeve patches for Barclays Premier League appliqués, and will use the squad number and player name font reserved for the top division too.

Furthermore, as Premier League rules do not permit multiple kit sponsors, the back of shirt patches (Scientific Laboratory Supplies) and shorts patches (Burflex Scaffolding) in use this year will not appear on the 2013/2014 kit. That should make for a less cluttered kit.

adidas will continue to be the club’s technical partner next season, as confirmed by the brand with the three stripes tweeting congratulations to the club along with a photo bearing their ‘all in’ slogan…

allin

Kit news round up – March

BoydProstate

The Football League’s charity of the year is The Prostate Cancer Charity and league clubs have being doing their bit to raise awareness of the charity’s aims and funds to go towards research and support for those contending with prostate cancer.

City have worn charity patches on their shirts in four games; The 5-2 home routing of Birmingham, away to Crystal Palace, in the televised Monday night game at Burnley and most recently in the 2-1 defeat against Nottingham Forest (as seen on Gorgeous George, above.)

282885_429700217103089_1274389486_n (1)

Former Tiger Henrik Pedersen recently paid respect to one-time team mate Andy Dawson, flying in from his native Denmark to attend the 2008 promotion season reunion night at Willerby Manor Hotel  that was part of Dawson’s testimonial year festivities. Mingling with Tiger Nationals after the event, he extended an open invitation to his pub in Silkeborg, Denmark.

The Facebook page of Sportspubben Målet (Målet is Danish for goal) features an image of three Henrik Pedersens in the pub, each wearing a shirt of one the three clubs the midfielder played for during his career. Behind the bar Henrik pulls a pint wearing a Silkeborg shirt, and the two Henriks quaffing ale at the bar are wearing the shirts of Bolton and City. Superb!
BGExVpnCYAAkUCG
We recently visited the National Football Museum in Manchester, and spied this seaside-style peep through photo board featuring a 1992/93 City shirt facing off with a brown Coventry away shirt from the Seventies. The board is part of the Football and Fashion exhibit currently displayed on the museum’s third floor, and were pretty sure the reference is not a flattering one to our beloved tiger skin shirt!
Finally, Hull City Kits was happy to help out Watford Palace Theatre in their hour of need, when they asked us to source a 1995-97 City away shirt for use in the forthcoming production ‘Jumpers for goalposts’. The theatre wrote about their efforts to find the right shirt on the Paines Plough blog, and tell us ‘Jumpers for Goalposts’ will be at Hull Truck Theatre in the Autumn.

Kit news round up

burflex

Eagle eyed fans watching the 0-0 draw with Leicester on Boxing Day will have noticed that a new appliqué had appeared on the playing kit. Two days later the club announced a sponsorship deal with local scaffolding firm Burflex, who would become back of shorts sponsor for the remainder of this season.

The Clay Street firm have struck a deal that covers not just the rest of the 2012/13, but also the whole of next season too, although if City were to be promoted this term the Burflex appliqués would not be used in 2013/14, as kit sponsorship is restricted to chest advertising only in the Premier League.

JakupovicShirt

Early in January the 3rd shirts worn at Bristol City were sent out to the winning bidders of an online auction that ended on Christmas Day. The Argentina blue shirts featured  ‘tash converters’ appliqués, as main sponsor Cash Converters used the televised game in late October to show their support of the Movember charity.

Scorer Sone Aluko’s shirt fetched a whopping £510, that along with cash raised from the sale of the rest of the shirts will go towards male cancer treatment research. We were rather chuffed to snag Liam Rosenior’s matchworn shirt, but what later grabbed our attention was the crest patches used on the goalkeeper shirts.

Tiger National Andy Bradley won Eldin Jakupović’s bench worn keeper jersey and sent us a photo of his purchase, showing that the crest used was the 3D effect, layered felt type which featured on City’s 2010/11 kits, whereas the outfield shirts all used the iron on (but meant to look stitched on) crests used on kits for both this season and for 2011/12. Dave Holmes, snagger of the matchworn ‘keeper shirt from that game, confirmed that Ben Amos’ jersey used the 2010/11 crest too. Curious.

CityAway80sFinally, a request for knowledge. The above photos were both for sale on Ebay recently, and show City in the Admiral away shirt introduced in 1982/83 and used throughout the six year period Admiral made City’s kits. The pinstriped away shirt is being worn with plain white socks and what black socks, do you know what game these images are from?

Tigers repeat tash patch trick

City’s shirts featured an amended sponsor for the second time this season when The Tigers and Crystal Palace played out an entertaining though goalless draw on Tuesday night. Main sponsor Cash Converters again used a game and our player garb to show their support for the Movember charity.

City first sported ‘tash converters’ on black moustache appliqués at Bristol City for the last game of October, when we wore the Argentina blue and white 3rd kit in a televised 2-1 win.

A stock of unsponsored blue shirts were used in that instance, but since the Palace game was at home and there wasn’t enough unsponsored amber shirts available, the moustache image was printed onto ‘amber’ patches that were plastered over the normal sponsor logo.

The patches weren’t quite the right amber, however. Furthermore, only one patched shirt was printed for each player, so when some players changed shirts at half time, there was a mixture of normal and amended sponsors on show for the second half.

Robbie Brady opted not to wear a moustachioed shirt at any point, so was the only player not to have one in the first half. In the second half only David Meyler, Alex Bruce and David Stockdale wore them until substitutes Nick Proschwitz, Liam Rosenior and Aaron McLean entered play with patched shirts on. Stockdale’s Cyan blue ‘keeper jersey didn’t require an amber patch, so the same type of decal used at Bristol City was applied to his shirt.

We quite liked the ‘tash converters’ look at Bristol City, it seemed fresh and funny and we are fond of the Argentina blue shirts, but doing it again, and having to cover existing logos with patches that are a slightly different colour to the shirt didn’t seem as clever or worthwhile.

We presume Cash Converters plan to auction the patched shirts, with proceeds going to male cancer charities, but they haven’t gotten round to putting the first lot of shirts up for grabs yet, and with the poppy shirts used at Cardiff also due for auction, we feel auction fatigue may set in.

Kit news round up

City’s 2012/13 third kit (a.k.a. the 2011/12 away kit) wasn’t expected to be worn until December 8th when we travel to Watford, but the decision to use a one-off sponsor appliqué in support of the ‘Movember’ male cancers charity at Bristol City saw the Argentina blue and white kit pressed into use.

Since the club had a cache of the blue shirts with no sponsor affixed, it was easier to apply the moustache decals to those rather than alter shirts that already bear Cash Converters’ logo. The ‘Tash Converters’ shirts, worn for the Sky Sports televised 2-1 win played on the evening of October 27th, are being auctioned soon with proceeds going to the charity that encourages month long sponsored moustache growth.

Because Bristol City favour the alarm orange Condivo ’12 goalkeeper jersey that The Tigers also use, a tan and black jersey was worn by Ben Amos. Swansea have used this colour shirt for most of this season, though we paired it with the black with white trim training shorts rather than tan shorts.

The Argentina blue shirts were given another run out at Cardiff, this time with the poppy appliqués marking Remembrance Sunday and the work of the Royal British Legion, City evidently only printed one set of shirts as many players who had poppies affixed in the first half didn’t have one in the second half. For the last few years poppy shirts have been auctioned, if these are too there’ll be a glut of blue third shirts up for grabs soon.

Home games have been less exciting from a kit perspective, though it was interesting that the ref for the Burnley kit had no problem with Dave Stockdale wearing Cyan blue in goal despite the visitors having blue shirtsleeves and shorts.

Finally, at Andy Dawson’s testimonial evening at the KC Stadium, the above shirt was up for auction. It’s an unsponsored (*scream*) version of the 2011/12 home shirt with an ‘Andy Dawson – Celebrating 10 years’ appliqué. These are brilliant, let’s hope there are more and they go on sale at Tiger Leisure.

Tigers’ kit converted for Bristol City trip

City’s shirts will feature a modified Cash Converters logo for the televised game at Bristol City on Saturday. The Australian pawnbroking and payday loan firm is publicly backing the Movember Foundation, a charity initiative that seeks to raise awareness of and funds to fight male cancers by encouraging men to grow moustaches in November.

Kitman John Eyre had planned to use the black away kit at both Middlesbrough and Bristol City, but since the club have a stock of sponsorless Argentina blue shirts, it makes sense to apply the ‘Tash Converters’ logo to the 3rd kit rather than modifying the already printed up black away shirts.

City wore the light blue shirts for the 1-1 draw at Ashton Gate last season, they were paired with navy blue alternate shorts so as not to clash with Bristol City’s white home shorts. For 2012/13 however, The Robins wear red shorts with their red shirts (based on the same ‘Autheno 12’ template as our amber and black home shirts) so Steve Bruce’s men can wear the white shorts with Argentina blue trim this time round.

Bristol City favour the same Alarm Orange goalkeeper kit used by Ben Amos this year, and our wearing blue shirts means the Cyan ‘keeper jersey is less than idea. The club have ordered a stock of the tan and black ‘Condivo 12’ goalkeeper kits so they have an alternative for such instances, but are not sure they will arrive in time to use on Saturday.

Wembley game shirt embroidery

Happy Wembley Day! Four years ago today City beat Bristol City 1-0 under the Wembley arch to secure the third and final Championship promotion spot and end our 104 year wait to play in the top flight.

They did so wearing shirts embellished with embroidery (the dictionary definition of embroidery is sewn on decoration, nowadays text tends to be heat transferred on, but the term embroidery is often used regardless of the application method) to mark the occasion.

The photo above shows then kitman Barry Lowe with a shirt ready for transportation, along with the team, to London. The text, applied underneath the Umbro double-diamond reads COCA-COLA CHAMPIONSHIP, PLAY OFF FINAL, WEMBLEY STADIUM, 24TH MAY 2008.

Other garments of interest worn by City players that sunny and oh-so-sweet day were the black Umbro anthem jackets worn before kick off…

…and the Coca-Cola branded tee shirts worn after the game by many players as the team made their way up the 107 steps to the ‘Royal Box’ to receive the play off winners trophy…

Andy Dawson wore his tee shirt back to front, whereas Sam Ricketts, Deano, Fraizer Campbell, Nick Barmby and Wayne Brown eschewed the league sponsor branded tees and stuck to just playing shirts.

JVoH: Big name signing

Before 2009, the longest surname of any Tigers player had been Faulconbridge, as in Craig, the forward loaned to City by Coventry in 1998/99. Faulconbridge’s seemingly superfluous ‘u’ gave his family name 13 letters, although his name never featured on a City shirt as the practice of putting names on the back of Football League jerseys didn’t begin until 1999/2000. Those 13 letters pale in comparison to the surname letter count of Jan Vennegoor of Hesselink, who joined City in September 2009 and played in our second (and ill fated) season in the Premier League.

The Dutchman, who had played for FC Twente and PSV Eindhoven in his homeland, and for Celtic in Scotland prior to his move to the KC Stadium, has a surname that is 20 letters long, which makes it little wonder that fans on messageboards used the shorthand ‘JVoH’. If you take the spaces in his name into account, JVoH’s surname takes up the room of 22 characters on a shirt, which must have been a headache for whoever had to print up shirts for the player and fans buying replicas.

Initially they went with the regular letters, which are 53mm tall on players shirts (replica shirt name letters are only 47mm) and because City radially arch the names, JVoH’s wrapped all the way around the number 29, almost completing a circle…

Later in the year though, an order went in for the narrower, but still 53mm tall letters that had  previously only been used by Manchester City’s Shaun Wright-Phillips (both players sported the thinner letters in the 1-1 draw at the now-Etihad Stadium in late November 2009). The narrower letters on JVoH shirts made their first appearance against Wigan on October 3rd 2009 and were used for the rest of the season.

The Guardian newspaper answered a query regarding the meaning of JVoH’s unusual surname, answering; “According to our research, Jan Vennegoor of Hesselink was thus named because, way back in the 17th century, two farming families in the Enschede area of Holland intermarried. Both the Vennegoor and Hesselink names carried equal social weight, and so – rather than choose between them – they chose to use both. ‘Of’ in Dutch actually translates to ‘or’, which would mean that a strict translation of his name would read Jan Vennegoor or Hesselink.

City mark ‘Hospice Football Week’ with shirt patches

Help the Hospices is the Football League charity for season 2011/12, and the last week has been designated ‘Hospice Football Week’. As part of the league wide team-up, each club has been twinned with a local hospice (City’s is Dove House) and in addition to a range of money raising activities, shirt patches mark the club’s commitment on the pitch. The patches featured on City player’s shirts on Tuesday for the 0-0 draw with Leeds and on Saturday’s 2-2 tie with Ipswich. The shirts will soon be auctioned off, with the money raised going to Dove House.