2019/20 primary kit by Umbro – First impressions

Umbro caught everyone by surprise on Friday when they released a primary shirt that riffs on the infamous 1992/93 tiger stripe home. So what do the HCK Kitgeeks make of it?

SombreEthyl: 

Well, it had to happen at some point. In the 27 years since the 1992 Matchwinner home shirt seared itself onto the footballing collective consciousness, it’s gone from ridicule to really cool. Once it topped every ‘worst kit ever’ list, but in the last few years the price of Matchwinner replicas on auction sites has rocketed and there has been a growing clamour to again have tiger stripes on a City shirt. It had become inevitable that a new shirt would reference the original sooner or later.

For my part, I wasn’t keen on revisiting the 1990s. Sure, I love the retro kitsch of the original, but felt that kind of lurid, all over print, belonged in the past. I was OK with using it as a warm up shirt design, but I feel such a tight pattern isn’t really appropriate for a match shirt. The purpose of a match shirt is to clearly distinguish a team from the opponent, to stand out, whereas a tiger’s stripes are a natural camouflage, they help a predator blend in to the background as it stalks prey. On a vertically striped shirt the amber stripes pop, they are easy to pick out, but the tight pattern of tiger stripes blurs together the black and the amber, from a distance the amber is hard to make out.

Umbro have recognised that, and in doing so have changed my mind about having a shirt with tiger stripes to an extent, because this is really good.

Their decision to have just a band of tiger stripes on the upper chest, and to have those stripes clearly defined and spaced out on a field of amber, is brilliant, and what makes this shirt work on every level. There should be no issue of ‘camouflaging’ here, it meets the basic match shirt requirement of distinctiveness in a way the 1992 shirt did not.

I like that the tiger stripe pattern on the shirts is uniform, it looks the same on every shirt, because a football shirt IS a uniform, the asymmetrical striping on the 1992/93 shirts was not a good thing. I’m OK with the stripes ending at the set in sleeves, and although I don’t love the collar, the inset trapezoid panel seems a bit unnecessary, I don’t mind it either.

My preference would have been for a small, black polo collar, but I suspect the window of such collars being used, such as on Manchester United 2013/14, France 2014 and Manchester City 2015/16 primary shirts, has been closed. (There’s a good article about this here… ‘The sunset of polo collar in football fashion’)

As much as having tiger stripes can be so, this is a really tasteful way of referencing both the club nickname and the 1992 home shirt, there’s nothing gaudy about it, and in contrast to the original, it doesn’t feel like a novelty affair. The sympathetic treatment of the sponsor wordmark is worthy of praise too.

The shirt has looked an orange tone in launch photographs, but I wonder if that’s just some over zealous Photoshop colour saturation, I’m hoping so.

It’s fascinating that very little has been made of the shorts and socks, the launch has been all about the shirt. We haven’t yet seen the 2019/20 home ‘kit’. There was an image of the black shorts and another of the amber socks, both seem simple affairs with minimal trim.

I believe Umbro have created a modern classic here. They’ve taken an iconic shirt as inspiration and given it a fresh, modern look that isn’t gaudy and anachronistic in the slightest. I was against a rehash of the 1992 shirt, but I’m not against this, it’s excellent.

We need to talk about the crest aesthetics though… Since it’s release and the seemingly rapturous response to it, something has gnawed away at me but I’ve left it unsaid. We’re all delighted to have the name back on the crest, but I think that delight is making people willing to overlook what’s happened to the tiger.

The great job Umbro have done in spacing the tiger stripes out, so that from afar it’s not a blurry mess is juxtaposed by what the club have done ‘updating’ the tiger head, which is now a blurry mess.

The stripes of the 1970s tiger head needed cleaning up, more definition, and what we have is less. A real tiger does not look like the creature on the new crest, and what the hell happened to the chin? It’s just been shaved off.

Now this can be easily fixed, we don’t need a new crest, it doesn’t need a total overhaul, it just needs looking at again.

@Adz238 So it’s here… the 19/20 home shirt, and I’m loving the throwback tiger print at the top of the shirt. Umbro have managed to do it with a lot of class and not make it to ‘in your face’.

I’m slightly disappointed that there’s no Umbro branding on the sleeves this season, I really liked the double diamond taping that’s been on the shoulders or sleeve cuffs the last two seasons.

I’m happy that Umbro is white to make it stand out from the rest and that SportPesa has stayed with the theme to keep a bit more black on the shirt, the way the badge goes in to a stripe makes the name on the badge pop out too.

All in all I’m very very happy with it, in a scale of 1-10 I’d give it a solid 8.5.

@MikeCarterHKR: When I am asked the question “who makes the best football shirts?” I always reply Umbro.

Why? Just look at what they’ve done with Hull City, again and again and again.

The new shirt is a clear throwback to our Matchwinner shirt from the early 90s. The stripes across the chest are just enough for me, they’ve been smart and logical with the placement, clearly showing club and sponsor branding. Umbro and Sportpesa have again colour coordinated their branding to give the shirt that finishing touch.

I would have liked to have seen what the shirt would have looked like if the stripes had extended to the sleeves too though, and the lack of Umbro taping disappoints me, but I feel I can bypass those feelings by hoping we’ll get some on the away or third shirt.

The neckline is something which confuses me a little. The solid black line meets an amber trapezium in the centre. I feel this is something which over complicates the neckline and a solid black crew finish would have looked better.

Our 2019/20 home shirt is the first to feature the new club crest, which sees the return of the club name to our shirt for the first time since 2013/14. The crest is again, presented in a parquet style on the shirt and I love this application.

I am happy that we haven’t gone down the route of stripes, pin stripes or twin stripes this season even though that is against our brand image. I feel clubs need to make changes every once in awhile to keep things fresh. I can see this shirt being a bigger seller for the club and I hope the reintroduction of the name, and the new club crest makes this shirt a must buy for all Hull City fans.

The new shirt goes on sale Saturday 29 June at Tiger Leisure

The Kitcast by Hull City Kits – Episode 5

The latest (and shortest) Kitcast is available for your viewing pleasure/displeasure. We cover the 2000/01 away shirt in depth, rank Umbro’s black kits, consider some of the WWC loveliness and a tribute to ‘La Società Ginnastica Sampierdarenese’.

The Kitcast by Hull City Kits – Episode 4

Episode 4 of the Kitcast is a poppy shirt special as we look back on ten seasons of shirts marking Remembrance Day.

Presented by Les and Adam, co-produced by Mikey and John.

2018/19 primary kit by Umbro – First impressions

The 2018/19 primary kit was unveiled seven days ago, and it’s time for the HCK kitgeeks (and guest reviewer @Adz238) to spill the beans on what they make of Umbro’s work… 

 

Disclaimer: We don’t like what the current crest stands for, this is well established, but that’s on the club and not on Umbro, and it’s their work that we are discussing here. Our not mentioning the crest should not be considered as tacit approval of it. 

 

@JGHullI like it.

My only issue right now is the weird block style on the rollover of the sock. As for the shirt, the stripes are different and I like them, they make for an interesting change from either large block stripes or pinstripes.

The biggest thing around the shirt for me though is that it connects properly. Unlike the balls up of last years shoulders, the collar, the stripes and the sleeves all connect seamlessly together.

The black sleeves are carried by plenty of amber on the front and back even if the the underarm of the sleeve appears to have some odd amber insert which cuts the lovely Umbro taping short. Why not solid black all round?

I’m assuming it’s comfort related somehow. Anyway, I’m picking a little. It looks ace and whilst my preference is for thicker stripes, this is a rather lovely change from the norm. So I like it. And that’s before you drape it over the delectable Jon Toral. Swoon

@Adz238: Where to start? How about the double-diamond cuff trim? That is stunning. I know other Umbro teams will have them but they are such a classic touch I’m happy that we got them too!

The double stripes on the body are a great touch as well, something that is both new and keeps the shirt bright with the amber flashing through the middle of the black. The neck line is also something I really like, I feel it leads brilliantly from the black sleeves into that contrasting amber, it cuts off the solid colour and amplifies it all at once.

I’m also a big fan of the sponsor staying simple, not reverting to the blue ball in the middle that I couldn’t stand a few years ago. Keeping it simple really helps make it a beautiful shirt.

The shorts have a nice flash of amber at the back and are quite contemporary, which is fantastic to see with the shirt making nods to the more classic stripe pattern. Moving on to the socks…. I’m happy that they are hooped, I’m a fan of hoops, however in this instance I feel the top of the sock is a lazy finishing touch with a black square left at the top of the turn over looking a little (a lot) out of place!

It’s a shame on an otherwise brilliant football sock. All in all a solid 9/10, surpassing last season’s Home kit, I’d go as far as to say it’s probably the best home kit of recent years.

SombreEthylBlimey. I’m in love.

Pulse-racing, pupil dilating, loin-stirring polyester love.

Now, I liked the 2017/18 home shirt a great deal when it was first unveiled, dynamic angled sleeve stripes and all, and came to really love it, to the extent that I could not conceive that Umbro could top it with their 2018/19 follow up. Yet here I am making declarations of love immediately after a kit unveiling.

I’m delighted that we have another striped shirt, we pretty much own the look of amber and black stripes and should always use it for that very reason. That said I think it’s important to maximise the amber in a striped shirt so that overall it looks bright. When grainy images of the kit photo-shoot appeared on Social Media, it was the black Raglan sleeves that stood out to me and I feared they would make the kit look dark overall. Thankfully that isn’t the case as the black stripes on the body panels are quite thin, allowing amber to dominate.

I think Raglan sleeves look better and fit better than set in sleeves, so they represent an upgrade on the 2017/18 home shirt I feel. I wouldn’t say the black stripes on this shirt are better than those of the previous iteration, but I like them a lot. To some the shirt has amber pinstripes atop black stripes, but instead I see a series of twin-stripes, rather than pinstripes. You know the stripes that appear on muscle cars from bonnet to boot? That’s what I see, and I think it’s a good way of retaining stripes but presenting them in a fresh way.

I think I preferred the round collar of the 2017/18 shirt to what’s going on here, but it doesn’t offend my sensibilities at all. Similarly double diamond ‘taping’ looked better going down the sleeve on the 2017/18 shirt than it does here on the cuffs, but the amber on these cuff bands serves to break up the blackness of the sleeves well.

This shirt reminds me of both Nike’s Inter shirt from last year and a shirt Puma made for Borussia Dortmund a few years ago. That’s good aesthetic company to keep!

The club have promised us they’ll start using Hull City rather than just Tigers or the Tigers in communications, and ‘We are Hull City’ on the shirt launch blurb was great to see. It’s a shame that doesn’t extend to the new kit, which still has TIGERS on the back near the neck but no mention of Hull City. I get that the kit will have been signed off months ago, prior to the promise to start using the club’s playing name, but this throwback to a more antagonistic time still rankles. To remedy this, I’d love to see ‘Hull City’ added to the player shirts with heat bonded letters under the numbers. Many German Bundesliga teams have the club name on the back of the shirts in this manner. I don’t think this will happen, but it would make me love a shirt I already love a lot a bit more.

Onto the shorts, they’re perfectly functional and don’t  inspire much comment, unlike the socks. I like the ‘twin-hoops’ which visually connect the socks to the shirts, but the splitting of the foldover band into a block of amber and a block of black is a little jarring. This might be something that I get used to, but on first viewing it looked strange.

It’s not enough to sully what I think is a wonderful kit however. I really didn’t think Umbro could make me love a kit more than I love the 2017/18 home, but they’ve pulled it off. Played, Umbro!

 

HCK Kitcast – episode 1

Ahead of the Tiger Rags exhibition,  we thought we’d take a retrospective look at the 2016/17 kit set. Opinions on kits can harden or soften over time, and sometimes a kit becomes viewed through the prism of a successful or failure filled season. So do we feel the same way about the white collared home shirt and the cactus purple third shirt now, as we did when we first saw them? James Richardson of TigerTube and Crap 90s Football joins us for this first HCK Kitcast.

Kit news round-up: Shorts stories and play-off patches

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The Tigers wore amber alternate shorts for the play-off semi-final at Derby on Saturday 14th May. Nothing odd about that, City went amber shorted twice in the league in 2015/16 (at Sheffield Wednesday in October and Brentford in November) and once in the FA Cup (at Bury in late January).

Indeed the most notable shorts story came at Derby in the league in April, when an off colour City lost 4-0 to the Rams, looking sartorially off colour by matching the away kit’s white shorts and socks with the amber with black primary shirts.

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A closer look at the shorts worn at Derby in the play-offs, however, offers an explanation for the earlier white shorted look at the iPro Stadium. The amber shorts worn earlier in the campaign were the 2014/15 alternate shorts recycled for this season (the thin black side stripes are a giveaway, they correspond to thin black bands on the cuffs of the otherwise amber 2014/15 home socks), but when the stock ran out, the Tigers opted to mix and match elements of the home and away kits.

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To prevent a re-occurrence in the play-offs, supplier Umbro advanced the delivery of next season’s alternate shorts, and those were used in the 3-0 first leg drubbing of derby. It is curious that City have worn two distinctive shorts in the 2015/16 year, but neither set was purposefully designed to go with this year’s primary shirt. Still, we love amber shorts used away from home, so are pleased there’ll be some in 2016/17.

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In other news, a photo on the club’s Twitter account revealed the play-off final shirts will have different sleeve patches to those used in the regular season. The patches feature the exultant player trailing a cloud of confetti graphic that appears on match tickets, and were first used in the 2014 edition of the play-offs.

 

 

City try a new look at Derby

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City’s performance was ugly at Derby, as the Tigers’ automatic promotion hopes took a potentially fatal blow in a 4-0 defeat. Their sartorial showing was below par too, as City elected to pair the away kit’s white shorts and socks with the home shirt.

The mash-up seems an odd choice,  inconsistent with how we’ve worn the home shirt with non-standard shorts so far this season. At Sheffield Wednesday in October, City used the amber alternate shorts (designed for use with the 2014/15 home kit) since the primary kit shorts of the home side are black. That look was replicated at Brentford in November, again to avoid a black shorts v black shorts clash and again at Bury in late January in the FA Cup 4th round.

City have also worn amber alternate shorts at Derby before, in 2011/12 in a 2-0 win and in 2012/11, another win, this time 2-1. The amber on white/white mash-up is the seventh look the Tigers have sported this season: in addition to the regular home kit (1), full away kit (2) and all-amber when away (3) ensembles, they’ve worn black home shorts with the white away shirts and socks (4, at Charlton), the white away shirts with home shorts and socks (5, at Forest) and the blueprint/scuba blue third kit (6) twice, at Bristol City and Rotherham.

The Derby away game also saw a first airing of the deep blue ‘keeper kit since late December when it was at Preston. You can view our updated season kit tracker here.

 

2014/15 away kit by Umbro – First impressions

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Having shown us the very sexy home kit last month, Umbro have revealed the primary change kit City will use in 2014/15. The chin stroking HCK kit geeks are ready to give their view…

SombreEthyl: “Hmm, that’s pretty good.

Although it doesn’t quite stir the loins like the home kit, which still has me in its thrall and makes me coo every time I see it, this is a rather decent design and a good addition to Umbro’s City kit pantheon.

Back to black then… I’ve always preferred all white as a first choice change kit, but when you’re replacing kits every season then it’s good to mix it up a bit, and I like the idea of a white-black-sky blue away kit rotation. Besides, a black away kit pretty much necessitates a third kit, so there is still room for all white yet! As an unabashed kit nerd I’ll never complain about having a third kit, I’ve never bought into the idea that a third kit is a rip off, that a fan is somehow compelled to buy all three kits. You aren’t, and I’ve no time for third kit based faux-outrage .

As far as all-black goes, the 2003/04 away kit was a bit of a game changer; the sight of Ian Ashbee, clad in a mean looking black kit with amber trim, his face flushed and arms pumping in triumph after scoring the goal against Yeovil that sealed a promotion 18 years overdue, that look signalled all-black as an accepted alternative for a change kit.

It’s true that a black kit isn’t veering very far from our regular look, but there is something pleasing about being able to avoid a clash while still wearing our club colours, just with the order reversed. If you can’t wear amber and black on your travels, then wear black and amber!

Although quite a simple design, the shirt has a rather interesting neckline that is both crew neck and V-neck, exposing a round amber underpiece that creates the impression that a black top is being worn over the home shirt. It’s a collar style used on the home and away shirts Umbro have made for French club Nantes this year, but thankfully it isn’t on any other English club’s shirts (at least as far as I’ve seen) so it doesn’t look so generic and templatey, that might be the biggest plus of going with Umbro; we won’t be sharing kit design with a glut of other Premier League clubs.

1415awayfront

I’ve made my feelings about the revised club crest clear on the home shirt review; the crest itself isn’t ugly, but the underlying reason for the change doesn’t sit right with me. Still, I’ve liked shirts carrying a crest I don’t like before (such as the 1999/00 home and away shirts) so I won’t make out that the crest sullies the shirt, I’d just rather our shirts carry the club name.

I would also have preferred for the Umbro marks on the chest and sleeves (and while I’m at it, those sleeve wordmarks are wholly redundant and unneeded) to have been applied in amber, because once you add the mostly white Premier League sleeve patches and white numbers and letters, the amount of amber on this shirt will be quite diluted.

Similarly, the white edging to the ventilation holes on the back should have been amber to maintain the look of a club specific garment. The front of the shirt readily identifies it as part of a Hull City kit, but from behind? Not so much. Just a tiny bit of amber on the back would have made a big difference, HULL CITY AFC stitched underneath the collar piece for example, would have really enhanced the shirt.

The sponsor looks a lot bigger on this shirt than on the home version, but again I quite like the Chinese text part of 12BET’s logo so that’s not an issue.

I like that the home shorts are reused for the away kit, it creates a uniformed look across the sets, and having socks that are a chromatic reversal of the home kit’s hose offers the flexibility to use home or away shirts and socks interchangeability should the need arise. I wonder if there are amber alternate shorts to further increase mash-up options, I quite liked the varied amber shorts adidas created so we could still wear the home shirt if the home team wore dark shorts.

Verdict: Not the most practical, but a smart away design nonetheless. 

I’d have liked a wee bit more amber contrast trim on the shirt, but overall this is a fine away kit and another classy design from Umbro, I’m pleased they are showing signs of a strong recovery after their cruel gutting by former owners Nike. If the home kit is A- then I’d give the away set a mark of B+.

Not sure about that away keeper kit though!”

1415awayback

JGHull:  So that’s new away kit is it? It’s ‘alright’.

I know it goes against the initial Twitter reaction (I saw one tweet describe it as ‘beautiful’ – really?) as well as the reaction of SombreEthyl, but I’m a bit ‘meh’.

Perhaps that’s because I’ve seen it already – most of us on social media saw the leak and you could see enough of it in that leak to make today’s announcement a bit of a non-event. That’s a shame as I wonder if my reaction would have been different if I’d not seen it. We’ll never know.

Let’s be clear – I don’t dislike it. It’s clean, uses our correct club colours and whilst I too would prefer us in an all white get up when we can’t wear our home kit, I agree with SombreEthyl that black kits have their place in our wardrobe. I also agree with his suggestion that pairing it with amber shorts could create a smart looking option. However, I just don’t get the over the top excitement surrounding it. Even Tom Huddlestone couldn’t hide his excitement stating in the press release that “the lads are buzzing with the new away kit” and that they “could feel the quality”. Tom, did you really say that? Heh.

Maybe the inevitable third kit will be all white? And whilst City in blue is good too (the Argentina blue kit from adidas looked great), I wouldn’t want the blue and red experiment of last year to be repeated.

1415awaydetail

I think my major problem with it is that it reminds me of the training wear, which frankly I think is a bit iffy. Go look at it on TigerLeisure.com – it’s not great is it? No detailing, no design, just plain black stuff with the Umbro logo and that badge (I too am going to leave the badge out of it this time). If you’re looking for adventure, you can have it in plain purple.

I know this sounds harsh but take the badge off and it looks like the cheaper stuff near the door in Sports Soccer. Am I being mean? Perhaps, but it’s not the snazzy Climacool gear that adidas provided us with in the last few years and it’s certainly not a good look for “wor Steve” as he prowls the touchline.

Let’s face some facts though – whilst kit geeks like us will pore over the details of our new fabric, it’s the moments that occur whilst wearing it that make a kit a classic.

Ian Ashbee punching the air at Yeovil. City at Watford in a play-off semi. City at Wembley for the play-off final. Great City kits need great City moments. Maybe this kit gets its moment in Europe? Fingers crossed.

Verdict: Smart enough alternative to a great home kit, impact dulled  by a leak and ‘matching’ training wear.

There’s just the third kit to be unveiled now, when it is we’ll let you know what we think. Now it’s your turn. Are you happy to be back to black? Give us your thoughts.

2014/15 home kit by Umbro – First impressions

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The wait is over…Umbro have unveiled the primary kit City will wear both home and abroad in 2014/15. So what do the HCK kit geeks make of it?

SombreEthyl: “Oh that’s beautiful. Very, very beautiful.

I consider the 1990-92 Matchwinner home to be the ideal City shirt; bold stripes with plain amber sleeves. Or at least, I did. This, I think, employs that look even better, it screams ‘HULL CITY’ even if the badge doesn’t carry the name.

As far as Umbro’s remit goes, they’ve nailed it, it’s a classic looking City kit with some neat technical features (such as the small white disc topped ventilation holes on the back). Simple round collar, lots of stripes that aren’t too thin, and solid amber sleeves to brighten a shirt that could look quite dark if the sleeves are striped too, or as they have been at times, solid black. Amber is the most important tone in our colour scheme, our kits should be bright, even with a striped shirt, and this is the way to achieve that.

Similarly, the socks should have lots of amber in them too, and if we aren’t replicating last years gorgeous hooped socks, then all amber is the next best thing. The thin black stripe on the foldover band complements the simple and elegant black shorts, which have an amber stripe of the same width on each side.

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The image leaked the day before the unveiling (grr, I hate grainy leaked pictures that have people on Twitter slagging off details they can’t see properly or may well have since been changed) showed a shirt with wonky alignment of the Umbro double diamond and club crest, that seems to have been put right, as has the sponsor, which was on a black background that did the shirt no favours at all.

The sponsor then… I have no problem with betting firms advertising on football shirts (I don’t like shirt advertising full stop, there are plenty of ways to be sponsored that don’t involve turning a team’s primary identifying mark into a billboard, but hey ho, this isn’t the time for that debate), so 12BET is a significant improvement on a pawn shop/payday moneylender.

My concern then is whether a sponsors logo affects the visual integrity of a shirt by being too big, or using colours that clash with a teams palette. With the earlier black background plate that was the case, but now that the sponsor is applied as white text with a black background, 12BET’s logo doesn’t look intrusive, and I actually think the logographic Chinese text looks cool. Nobody with Hull City’s interests at heart has opposed the club trying to tap into the Asian market for sponsorship, they just don’t think changing the club’s name to that end is worth that or necessary, and seeing hanzi text on a City shirt proves that.

The crest then… Y’know, as a shirt badge, which is often different from a club crest or a single element of it (think Arsenal with just a cannon, or City from the 1940s-1970s with a scraggy looking tiger that never appeared anywhere but on the shirts), the shield with just the tiger head and ‘1904’ looks alright, although I still think it’s daft to not have the club’s name on the shirt. It’s when you see a nameless crest on the side of the KC Stadium that it looks silly, but as a shirt badge it’s not so bad (it’s better than the awful clipart crab crest from the 1999/2000 shirt, which crest aside, I love) though I’d much prefer the beloved crest used from 2002 till the FA Cup final.

If this had the old crest, I’d declare this the perfect Hull City kit, and since the crest switch is on the club and not the supplier, Umbro should be praised to high heaven for providing the club with a perfect Hull City kit.

Verdict: Very close to perfection.

The club have indicated there may be a different sponsor or the club’s charity of the year on the shirts used in Europe, so there is the worry of an intrusive logo yet to be allayed there, but for now I’m very happy with that home kit and I’m looking forward to seeing the club’s own name and numbers fonts for Europe too.”

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JGHull: “That’s almost it. That’s not just the latest Hull City AFC kit, that’s almost *the* Hull City AFC kit. There are two things which prevent me from fawning over it completely, with one maybe more major than the other.

I’ve got to agree with SombreEthyl (which pains us both) but I think Umbro have hit their brief squarely on the head. It’s a gorgeous, bold striped shirt with a simple, slightly old fashioned collar. I like the amber sleeves too. The white Umbro detailing on the sleeve cuff adds a little something. It’s the perfect Hull City shirt.

But I can’t get past the badge.

The new badge actually looks OK in situ and I’m going to leave the politics out of it (but would seriously prefer our shirts to carry our proper name) but what went on with the kerning (designer-ponce word for the spacing between the letters)? Why is the 1 of 1904 so far away from the rest of the numbers? It’s such a simple thing. I’ve seen someone tweak it and post on Twitter and it makes such a difference. 2 more minutes spent on the badge artwork and it would have been so much tidier. I can’t unsee it. I suspect the embroidery may cover it up slightly as it might be hard to replicate at that small size with a needle and thread but look at it at a decent size and the kerning really lets it down. You can see it now too can’t you? Sorry.

To summarise, put the old crest on and we’re done – Hull City shirt design could be ticked off as mission completed. It’s that good.

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As for the full kit, I’d always have hooped hosiery. Always. It just looks fantastic with the striped shirts. Maybe next year Umbro? However, that’s a minor gripe really.

My last words are reserved for the sponsor. I think the Chinese text looks brilliant. Seriously. A Hull City shirt carrying an Asian sponsor looks brilliant – I don’t really care that it’s a bookies. Let’s face it, the horse has bolted on bookies slapping their names all over Premier League kits but as a logo, 12BET looks great. I’m glad the design was changed from a black sponsors patch across the stripes to an heavy black keylined logo too (the patch being seen on the leak that SombreEthyl refers to above). To top it off, the club seem happy that it’s a great deal for them which frankly makes it a great deal for everyone. An Asian sponsor paying good money and without having to change the club name to attract them is a win-win for everyone.

Verdict: Well played Umbro. Very well played.

The leaked images imply the away kit will be all black, which necessitates a third kit. We’re hoping for classy all-white, but when both change kits are unveiled (and here’s hoping there’s no crappy leaks this time), we’ll let you know what we think. Now it’s your turn. Disagree with a our Umbro love-in or ready to jump on the double-diamond bandwagon? Give us your thoughts.

Umbro and Hull City sign four year kit deal

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As predicted on our Twitter feed, Hull City will wear Umbro made kits in 2014/15 and for three seasons beyond after signing a 4 year deal with the Cheadle based firm.

Umbro did a great job with City’s kits between 2007-2010, their plain amber shirt from 2007/08 is synonymous with promotion achieved via the play-offs at Wembley, their only true striped City shirt of that deal was worn when The Tigers cut a swath through the Premier League in the early part of 2008/09 (including away wins against Arsenal and Tottenham) as City defied the odds to stay up. Umbro’s pinstriped 2009/10 was lovely, and clothed our players in their first appearance in the Barclay’s Asia Trophy contested in Beijing, China, although it had an unhappy end when City were relegated back to the Championship.

Our favourite Umbro City kit? The magnificently pure all white away kit from 2007/08 that also saw service in 2008/09 as a third kit worn at Newcastle in an FA Cup tie. We look forward to seeing Umbro’s first offering as part of the new deal,and the effort they put into marketing City kits.

WhiteUmbroGoodness

The teaser campaigns run ahead of the three seasons they made apparel for The Tigers were professionally, tastefully and respectfully done, they made Hull City feel like a.celebrated stable member rather than just a team to foist ubiquitous templates onto, and it is good to see Britain’s most noted kit maker recover after they were cruelly gutted and ditched by Nike.

Having Dean Windass and Geovanni be part of the deal unveiling as ‘Umbro heroes’ at half time between City v Arsenal was a lovely touch. Is it too late for Umbro to whip us up an FA Cup final kit? Probably, though it would be nice to see us play at Wembley without a tat shop being advertised on our garb. Adidas got a raw deal seeing that plastered on their shirts, though it is yet to be soon who will replace the pawnbrokers as main club sponsors for 2014/15.